Should I Accept that LinkedIn Invitation?

By Hootsuite | 1 year ago | No Comments

Alexandra Samuel speaking at The MeshMarketing Conference 12. Photo Credit to LexnGer via Flickr
Alexandra Samuel speaking at The MeshMarketing Conference 12. Photo Credit to LexnGer via Flickr

Alexandra Samuel is Vice-President of Social Media at Vision Critical, and is a Guest Contributor to the HootSource Blog. This is an excerpt from Alexandra’s recent post in the Harvard Business Review.

Should I Accept that LinkedIn Invitation? (The Favor Test)

LinkedIn Owly

The favor test is simple: Would you do a favor for this person, or ask a favor of them? If so, make the connection. If not, take a pass.

A favor isn’t constrained to an introduction; other kinds of requests come into play on LinkedIn: Would you support my charity? Will you attend my conference? Can you review my book? If you’re consistent in applying the favor test, you can build a LinkedIn network that is useful and efficient in supporting any professional goal.

But you don’t want to be one of those people: the kind of person who evaluates people based on a number. The whole point of the favor test is to think about the two-way quality of your relationships. LinkedIn has its most dramatic impact when a favor goes from a hypothetical test to a tangible action — when you make those introductions, or when you meet that key individual at a company you’ve always dreamt of working for. Once you see your LinkedIn network not only as a way to realize your own goals but also as an asset you can share with the people you believe in, you’ll find it gives you much more than a few more sales leads, or a higher rank in the stack of resumes on a recruiter’s desk.

Read this post in its entirety at HBR.

Do you want to learn more about how to improve your LinkedIn Page performance? Take a look at our 5 Best Practices for LinkedIn. To explore how HootSuite can help manage your social media accounts, sign-up and test it out at no cost for 30 days!

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1 comments
buildandbalance
buildandbalance

This is certainly a valid way of looking at LinkedIn. However, it's not the only viable means to determine if you should accept a connection request or not. Case in point, I'm teaching a class on social media at a local university and part of the curriculum includes LinkedIn. Now several of the students have asked to Connect with me. I'm not sure that I have favors to ask or give to all the students who will come through my classes, but I'm not about to Ignore any of their requests. That's not my personality.